vaginal-diabetus:

Once again… I can not with this scene.

One of the more deliberate moments where the watcher witnesses the depth of Sherlock’s pining.  Sherlock is referring to John’d romanticism in relation to his blog.. which, let’s be clear, is a blog revolving around Sherlock.  John isn’t romanticizing crime, or murder, or the generality of cases…  he’s romanticizing Sherlock, his mind, his acuity, their time together, who Sherlock is specifically as a man and John responds to Sherlock’s identity by writing about it with great depth and affection.   

Up until now Sherlock has been the primary recipient of John’s romantic attentions.  Not outright physical romance, but something with perhaps even far greater intimacy.  John accounting Sherlock with beautiful sincerity, and genuine respect, his words making Sherlock into something desirable.  (Which in turn, Sherlock returns that same level of romanticism in his best man’s speech.)

Sherlock was probably content just having that from John.  Having love expressed through the safe medium of John’s blog.  Sherlock’s small hesitation and and averting his eyes so he’s not looking right at John, pursing his lips.  His tone and expression is a cocktail mix of regret, guilt over having these feelings in the middle of this event, and internalized longing.  

//cries forever

his words making Sherlock into something desirable.”  

(via abbykate)

nprfreshair:

On Monday, Maureen Corrigan spoke to Fresh Air about her book, So We Read On: How The Great Gatsby Came To Be and Why It Endures.  When Gatsby was published in 1925 it was a flop, but World War II turned that around. In fact, the Atlantic just published an article about the Armed Services Editions—books that were given to soldiers to keep in their uniform pockets so they had something to read to take their mind off of the death and destruction. 
Here’s what Yoni Appelbaum of Atlantic says: 

Some of the selections [for the Armed Services Editions] were idiosyncratic. In 1945, Council picked out an older novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald that had never achieved popular success. It sold just 120 copies the previous year, and another 33 in 1945 before going out of print. The 155,000 copies of The Great Gatsby that they shipped out to the troops dwarfed all its previous print runs combined. Buoyed by that exposure, it would go on to become one of the great publishing successes of the 20th century.

Learn more about Gatsby’s incredible revival here. 

nprfreshair:

On Monday, Maureen Corrigan spoke to Fresh Air about her book, So We Read On: How The Great Gatsby Came To Be and Why It Endures.  When Gatsby was published in 1925 it was a flop, but World War II turned that around. In fact, the Atlantic just published an article about the Armed Services Editions—books that were given to soldiers to keep in their uniform pockets so they had something to read to take their mind off of the death and destruction.

Here’s what Yoni Appelbaum of Atlantic says: 

Some of the selections [for the Armed Services Editions] were idiosyncratic. In 1945, Council picked out an older novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald that had never achieved popular success. It sold just 120 copies the previous year, and another 33 in 1945 before going out of print. The 155,000 copies of The Great Gatsby that they shipped out to the troops dwarfed all its previous print runs combined. Buoyed by that exposure, it would go on to become one of the great publishing successes of the 20th century.

Learn more about Gatsby’s incredible revival here

What I can’t understand is how anyone who has learned anything at all about Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss — through their work or their words about their work — would think for one minute that they would let some other writers be the first to create an openly gay Sherlock Holmes (because someone IS going to be first). Not gonna happen. 

Sherlock is gay and John is bi.

And Ben Stephenson is on a mission from god.